Resonance Factor (the relationship and substance use)

To work with lapse from the perspective of the “resonance factor” Case Study (based on a service user’s experience)…
12th July 2017
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Resonance Factor (the relationship and substance use)

Resonance Factor (Relationship)

 

Replacing the term addiction with relationship is fundamental to the way that a client may view themselves. To think about it in a different context, someone wouldn’t say that they are addicted to their partner. Surely they would say that they are in a relationship.

 

Social user

 

This is when someone discovers substances. What a discovery it could be. They can then choose to sign a silent contract with the substance, and the silent contract would go like this. “I like you. I also like how you make me feel. Id like to have a relationship with you, but our relationship is going to be casual as I have other things in my life. We will get together every Saturday night, but I cant allow you to become a permanent item in my life.” With this silent agreement, the contract and the relationship begins.

 

At this stage the individual will not allow their drug use to dictate the way they live their life. They can still go to work, go on holidays, go gym daily, or whatever they are obligated to do in their life.

 

Problematic user.

 

This is when an individual revisits the original contract as they want more from the relationship, as they miss the substance when it is not in their system. They now feel its time for the relationship to evolve. The individual then approaches their substance and says “ we have been together now for a while. We now know each other. I think its time to take our relationship to a different level. I want to see you as much as I can. In fact how would you feel about moving in with me ? That way I can experience you all day. In fact I will se you before I go to bed and wake up with you in the morning. Im having this conversation with you as I cant live without you . With you in my life it has meaning. You make the dull seem exciting. But I will tell you this. I don’t want to share you with the eternal world as they will try to break us up, because they will not understand it. Only we do”

 

Janus believes that by avoiding the word addiction and referring to it as a relationship can allow the service user to explore their drug use in an experiential way. After all, It shouldn’t be hard to relate to as everyone has been involved in a relationship. They start from the time that a human being has the capacity to communicate.

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